How to Protection Against Sexually Transmitted Diseases (STD)

Protection Against Sexually Transmitted Diseases (STD)

Protection against sexually transmitted diseases (STD)

There is No sex remains the best protection against sexually transmitted diseases (STD). However, you could protect yourself by having sex with a condom & a vaccine.

Condoms

Safe sex is practiced by applying a condom while having vaginal or anal sex. It protects you against gonorrhea, chlamydia, HIV and hepatitis B, also reducing the risk of infection with another STDs. The risk of STD infection also diminishes as you use the dental dam or a condom to perform oral sex.

If you've got only one partner and you use another form of birth control, you do not need condoms. The only condition is that you have both tested negative for HIV and other STDs and safe sex is only between you two and not with others. In all other cases, it is advisable to use a condom during sexual contact because you can never be sure that the person with whom you have sex free from HIV or other STDs.

Vaccines

A vaccine causes your body develops antibodies when it comes in contact with a specific disease, so you do not get infected. For some STDs, there is a vaccine that protects against infection. Vaccines exist against:

  • hepatitis B
  • hepatitis A and B
  • genital warts (HPV)

Inquire at it with your doctor. For HIV, there is still no vaccine.

Circumcision as protection against STDs?

Various studies have shown that circumcised men were less at risk of infection with HIV and STDs. In sub-Saharan countries where HIV occurs much more than ours, circumcision is a way to reduce the risk of HIV infection. But it indeed provides no security.

PrEP and PEP after a high risk of HIV

PEP is a course of medication which may require a physician if you have run a high risk of HIV infection. Such treatment can occur under certain conditions that HIV establishes itself in the body. PrEP – take HIV medications you are exposed to HIV is still in an experimental phase and is not widely available yet for Protection Against Sexually Transmitted Diseases (STD).

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